Microwave Radar Module as PIR replacement.



  • http://www.cnx-software.com/2016/04/04/tiny-microwave-radar-module-detects-movements-up-to-9-meters-away-for-2/

    Has anyone used these? They could decrease the profile size of a PIR style sensor. Also 3.3V. Thoughts?


  • Hardware Contributor

    I have some HB100, cheap Doppler sensor, and a board in progress for playing with this (I know I have lot of pcb in progress 😆 ), almost designed but not checked/ordered yet as I want to do some changes on few others boards and panelize. Eagle addictions...argh!
    I am planning to use this for security coupled with other things like ir barrier...not sure when this project will be finished 😕
    http://fr.aliexpress.com/item/HB100-Microwave-Doppler-Radar-Wireless-Module-Motion-Sensor-HB100-Microwave-Motion-Sensor-Motion-Detector/32279220849.html?spm=2114.06010108.3.1.LRWuwZ&ws_ab_test=searchweb201556_9,searchweb201602_1_10017_10005_10006_10034_10021_507_10022_10020_10018_10019,searchweb201603_8&btsid=7bd4e1d3-a68e-4541-86a3-1df56d9f5d14
    Your link seems interesting, I will order one, too tempting in my sensors collection 🙂
    but that is not really comparable to pir...in terms of power consumption! And like pir, it's sensitive to power supply (for hb100, I don't know for the module you pointed).



  • Very interesting module indeed. Not only decrease the profile but more importantly, it could be behind the wall(!). Have to place an order right away, thanks.


  • Mod

    @scalz funny that most of these low cost radars use the BISS0001 chip, the same as used in the PIR sensors 😏



  • That's may change a lot of things, in term of power consumption, enclosure, sensor position in the room.
    Will order one right now.

    Thanks for the find.


  • Hardware Contributor

    @Yveaux yep maybe I don't know, I have not checked this! where do you see this just for curiosity...


  • Mod


  • Hardware Contributor

    @Yveaux ahah excellent another module! do you have one of these ?
    On all specs they all claims few mA, not sure if it's the best idea on batt..I was thinking to use these things on AC. but that will need tests on power supply.
    HB100 I have are shielded..don't know which module is best. I was inspired from this
    http://www.limpkin.fr/index.php?post/2013/08/09/Making-the-electronics-for-a-%247-USD-doppler-motion-sensor

    Edit: the link you pointed, wow the module seems very small!


  • Mod

    @scalz no, just browsing on Ali.
    These modules are active, in contrast to PIRs, so I expect their power usage to always be higher than PIRs.
    But it won't hurt ordering some I guess 😆


  • Hardware Contributor

    @Yveaux completely agree😃 hop, in the basket 😆


  • Hero Member

    Looks like an interesting module. Since these are advertised as working in the 5.8 GHz band, it would be interesting to see exactly where in the band they are and if they cause interference for WiFi channels.

    Cheers
    Al



  • I was inspired by this topic and bought some cheap modules from ebay:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-8GHZ-Microwave-Radar-Sensor-6-9M-Smart-Switch-for-Home-Control-/401082379029?hash=item5d625f6b15:g:4BMAAOSwxp9W2Ser

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Microwave-Radar-Sensor-LED-Light-Control-Smart-Switch-Precise-for-Spherical-Lamp-/351673918969?hash=item51e16625f9:g:rYAAAOSwZ8ZW4MpE

    Does anyone know how to hook them up? Was anyone able to make them work? The chinese seller is not really helpful in providing some more details.
    I really like the idea of having a motion sensor behind a wall (read: out of sight), even if it means powering it from a wall socket.


  • Hero Member

    @danta lol - I too was inspired by this thread and bought a couple of modules which arrived last week. Mine are identical to those in your first ebay link.

    I've not tried to use them yet, but I think you use them identical to a PIR. ie VCC, GND and Signal.

    As @Yveaux mentioned... these use the same IC as the PIR's, but these do seem to lack the ability to tune the sensitivity and timeouts like the PIR's have.

    So in short... try to use them as you would a PIR.


  • Admin

    @danta

    Interesting! Must have missed this topic... Never seen those before.



  • There are units that are fitted into light fittings that are being used as fall detectors; a PIR knows someone is in the room but something measuring the height of the person moving around that suddenly notices an increase in the distance can trigger an alarm. An increase in distance can mean that the person is now on the floor and no longer vertical. Something like this could be used maybe?


  • Hero Member

    I have this one, but did not have time to test it yet 2-16M : Gravity: Digital Microwave Sensor (Motion Detection)

    http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1403#.VzNKlfndWnk



  • I started playing with the first module listed in my previous post:

    0_1463001162404_sensor.jpg

    The module is really as easy to connect as a normal pir sensor. There are small text on the pcb. The top most connection (indicated with a 'o') is the sensor output (3,3v for a high and 0v for a low). The middle connection is ground and the bottom connection is Vcc (3,3 to 20v according to the ebay listing).

    0_1463001269028_connection.jpg

    My setup was really simple, just a chinduino powered via usb. The sensor connected to +5v, ground and the output to analog pin A0 (I could have used a digital pin).

    0_1463001506022_setup.jpg

    The first results are really promising. Some characteristics:

    • The sensor is omnidirectional.
    • Output is high (3,3V) for 30s when movement is detected
    • New movement will restart the 30s timer
    • 'low' power consumption. Triggered: 1.5mA; Idle: 1.4mA (measured @5v using a normal multimeter)
    • The sensor doesn't react to temperature/light fluctuations (unlike most pir sensors)

    Some range tests that triggered the output (note that this is probably not the maximum distance, just the stuff I tested):

    • 0-4 meter distance (clear line of sight), moving my arm
    • 5-8 meter distance (clear line of sight), walking around
    • walking around at 5 meter distance with an indoor brick wall between me and the sensor

    Stuff that I still need to test:

    • Can the sensitivity be tweaked
    • How to change the trigger timer to something else than 30s
    • Duration test to see if the module is prone to false positives


  • hi @danta

    Did you have any luck removing the 30 second delay/counter from the radar module?



  • @danta, this device can detect you when you are in another room ?

    @drock1985,
    detection delay can be adjusted from 1 second to hundreds of second (two minutes max) by adjusting R6 resistor on the board as explained on this Taobao page (Chinese). By default there’s no resistor and the delay is 30 seconds, and you can adjust the delay by using 1K to 250K resistor.



  • @drock1985, Didn't test it yet. I was playing with the other module I bought. Too bad that the other module only seems to work stable from 6V and up (I should have known it, as it was listed on ebay as 7-12v). I was just hoping that it would work at lower voltages. So I will probably stick with the first module for now.

    @vil1driver, Yes, detection works through wall and door. I only tested it at a distance of about 5 meter with a brick indoor wall between me and the sensor. I also had to walk around before the sensor picked me up (just lifting my arm wasn't enough).


  • Hero Member

    Seems like these modules are using the BISS0001 so it will probably not be possible to run them on a battery node because the BISS has a 3V minimum voltage demand. The current consumption is anyhow also a bit to high for battery application (3mA).

    0_1465813900381_WP_20160613_13_16_48_Pro.jpg



  • I've bought a couple of these and in many ways have been impressed.
    My only issue is that I find them far too sensitive (e.g. Detecting movement through wallls)
    Has anyone managed to reduce the sensitivity?



  • @Luke-Corkill said:

    I've bought a couple of these and in many ways have been impressed.
    My only issue is that I find them far too sensitive (e.g. Detecting movement through wallls)
    Has anyone managed to reduce the sensitivity?

    To reduce sensitivity workaround - Can you place them high and point them in an angle pointing downwards to ground? will this work?


  • Hero Member

    There has been some chat about these modules over on Pete Scargill's site.
    Seems that using some aluminium foil you can create a shield so there are at least directional.

    Here is the thread ( starting at the relevant comment)

    http://tech.scargill.net/microwave-radar/#comment-16685

    I have not tested this myself yet...



  • @gregl
    Thanks for good link 🙂
    Yes offcurse I'm so sloooooow we need a proper waveguide or a hornet antenna, so ensure correct directionality 😉

    This might not be needed, but a hint what could be done: http://hforsten.com/horn-antenna-for-radar.html

    When my doppler radar arrives I will make a trial with a small tinbox I don't know about using alufoil is good for a long periode used outside
    http://hackaday.com/2014/02/24/guest-post-try-radar-for-your-next-project/#jp-carousel-115578



  • @Yveaux I did some extensive testing on the FC1816 module and I thought I might drop my experience:

    http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/226031/pinout-of-microwave-motion-sensor-fc1816

    In the end I used an 150ohm Series resistor + ~100µF cap behind this to power the FC1816. This eliminated much of the leftover noise. If this is not enough I presented a way to lower the module amplification. In the end I deactivated the biss-trigger output alltogether and grabbed the raw signal. Doing some manual processing:

    1. take 100 reads
    2. get the stddev (statistics library)
    3. high stddev = high fluctuation in values = movement

    Take a look at my current working copy of my code for the FC1816:

    Some notes:

    I power the VCC of the FC1816 from some arduino pins. Thus I can deactivate the microwave sensor at will. This is still not recommended. If you visit the previous link you can see that the BISS has some kind of "warmup"-Period.

    I use 3,3Volt to power the NRF24, the arduino and the FC1816 and suffered no strange consequences so far.

    Get get some insight about the link quality of the NRF24 I made the function RF24_getObserverTX() accessible from user-space:

    MySensors\drivers\RF24\RF24.cpp

    uint8_t RF24_getObserveTX(void)
    {
    	return RF24_readByteRegister(OBSERVE_TX);
    }
    

    MySensors\drivers\RF24\RF24.h

    uint8_t RF24_getObserveTX(void);
    

    The Idea behind the OBSERVE_TX register is that the lower byte presents the number of retrys the NRF24 used in the last send.
    The upper 4 bits present the number of total failed packets. I suggest using (0x0F & RF24_getObserveTX()) to get a usable number 0-15 presenting the retry-count. Anything > 0 suggests a packetloss on your link. 15 most likely will mean you ran into an complete fail as the max number of retrys was exhausted.

    This number might be capped by

    // ARD, auto retry count
    #define RF24_ARC 15
    

    from the RF24.h driver-file.

    TO not run into compiling errors you might need:

    http://arduiniana.org/libraries/streaming/
    https://github.com/RobTillaart/Arduino/tree/master/libraries/Statistic

    MicrowaveRadarSensor.ino

    #include <Streaming.h>
    #include "Statistic.h"
    
    
    /**
     * The MySensors Arduino library handles the wireless radio link and protocol
     * between your home built sensors/actuators and HA controller of choice.
     * The sensors forms a self healing radio network with optional repeaters. Each
     * repeater and gateway builds a routing tables in EEPROM which keeps track of the
     * network topology allowing messages to be routed to nodes.
     *
     * Created by Henrik Ekblad <henrik.ekblad@mysensors.org>
     * Copyright (C) 2013-2015 Sensnology AB
     * Full contributor list: https://github.com/mysensors/Arduino/graphs/contributors
     *
     * Documentation: http://www.mysensors.org
     * Support Forum: http://forum.mysensors.org
     *
     * This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
     * modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License
     * version 2 as published by the Free Software Foundation.
     *
     *******************************
     *
     * REVISION HISTORY
     * Version 1.0 - Henrik EKblad
     * 
     * DESCRIPTION
     * Example sketch showing how to measue light level using a LM393 photo-resistor 
     * http://www.mysensors.org/build/light
     */
    
    #define MY_NODE_ID 10
    #define MY_BAUD_RATE 57600
    
    // Enable debug prints to serial monitor
    //#define MY_DEBUG 
    
    // Enable and select radio type attached
    #define MY_RADIO_NRF24
    //#define MY_RADIO_RFM69
    
    #include <SPI.h>
    #include <MySensors.h>  
    
    #define LIGHT_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN A3
    #define MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN A1
    
    unsigned long SLEEP_TIME = 1000; // Sleep time between reads (in milliseconds)
    
    #define CHILD_ID_LIGHT 0
    #define CHILD_ID_MICRO 0
    #define TRIPPED_THRESHOLD 50
    
    MyMessage msg_light(CHILD_ID_LIGHT, V_LIGHT_LEVEL); // 23
    MyMessage msg_micro(CHILD_ID_MICRO, V_TRIPPED);     // 16
    MyMessage msg_micro_debug(0,V_VAR1);   // 24
    MyMessage msg_obstx_debug(0,V_VAR2);   // 25
    
    void before()
    {
      // LightSensor
      pinMode(A3,INPUT_PULLUP);
      pinMode(A2,OUTPUT);
      digitalWrite(A2,LOW);  
    
      // Microwave
      pinMode(5,OUTPUT);        // VCC BISS0001
      digitalWrite(5,HIGH);
      
      pinMode(6,OUTPUT);        // Enabled
      digitalWrite(6,LOW);      // Enable
      
      pinMode(7,OUTPUT);        // GND
      digitalWrite(7,LOW);
      
      pinMode(8,OUTPUT);        // VCC Radar
      digitalWrite(8,HIGH);
    
      pinMode(A1,INPUT);        // PIR 2nd Amplification Stage
    
      // Other
    }
    void setup()
    {
     
    }
    void presentation()  {
      // Send the sketch version information to the gateway and Controller
      sendSketchInfo("Microwave+Light", "1.0");
    
      // Register all sensors to gateway (they will be created as child devices)
      // https://www.mysensors.org/download/serial_api_20#sensor-type
      present(CHILD_ID_LIGHT, S_LIGHT_LEVEL);
      present(CHILD_ID_MICRO, S_MOTION);
      //present(0, S_ARDUINO_NODE);
      
    }
    
    void loop()      
    {     
      // Report VCC
      static long vcc = readVcc();
      static int vccpercent = map(vcc,1800,3280,0,100);
      sendBatteryLevel(max(min(vccpercent,100),0),false);
      Serial << "| vcc: ";
      p(F("%4d"),vcc);
      Serial << " ";
      // Required for ack
      //wait(100);
    
      // Report LightLevel
      analogRead(LIGHT_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
      int lightLevel_raw = analogRead(LIGHT_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
      int lightLevel = (1023-lightLevel_raw)/10.23; // as of 1023 !!
      Serial << "| light_raw: ";
      p(F("%4d"),lightLevel_raw);
      Serial << " ";
      Serial << "| light: ";
      p(F("%3d"),lightLevel);
      Serial << " ";
      send(msg_light.set(lightLevel),false);
    
      // Report WirelessLink Information
      Serial << "| observe_tx: ";
      uint8_t obstx = RF24_getObserveTX();
      p(F("%X"),obstx);
      Serial << " ";
      send(msg_obstx_debug.set(0x0F&obstx),false);
     
      // Report Microwave
      Statistic mw_s;
      mw_s.clear();
      
      delay(90);
      analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
      delay(10);
      for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
      {
        mw_s.add(analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN));
        delay(1);
      }
      Serial << "| mw_raw: ";
      int stddev = mw_s.pop_stdev();
      p(F("%4d"),stddev);
      Serial << " ";
      
      Serial << "| mw_min: ";
      int minimum = mw_s.minimum();
      p(F("%4d"),minimum);
      Serial << " ";
    
      Serial << "| mw_max: ";
      int maximum = mw_s.maximum();
      p(F("%4d"),maximum);
      Serial << " ";
      
      Serial << "| mw: " << (stddev > TRIPPED_THRESHOLD ? "1" : "0") << " ";
      send(msg_micro_debug.set(stddev),false);
      while(!send(msg_micro.set(stddev > TRIPPED_THRESHOLD ? "1" : "0"),true))
      {
        wait(10);
      }
      
      if(isTransportOK()) 
        wait(100);
      else
        wait(1000);
      Serial << endl;
      //mysleep(500);
    
    }
    // https://forum.mysensors.org/topic/3463/m_ack_variable-or-m_set_variable/2
    void receive(const MyMessage &message) {
      if (message.isAck()) {
          Serial.print("| GW ack");
          }
    }
    

    Helper.ino

    long readVcc() {
      // Read 1.1V reference against AVcc
      // set the reference to Vcc and the measurement to the internal 1.1V reference
      #if defined(__AVR_ATmega32U4__) || defined(__AVR_ATmega1280__) || defined(__AVR_ATmega2560__)
        ADMUX = _BV(REFS0) | _BV(MUX4) | _BV(MUX3) | _BV(MUX2) | _BV(MUX1);
      #elif defined (__AVR_ATtiny24__) || defined(__AVR_ATtiny44__) || defined(__AVR_ATtiny84__)
        ADMUX = _BV(MUX5) | _BV(MUX0);
      #elif defined (__AVR_ATtiny25__) || defined(__AVR_ATtiny45__) || defined(__AVR_ATtiny85__)
        ADMUX = _BV(MUX3) | _BV(MUX2);
      #else
        ADMUX = _BV(REFS0) | _BV(MUX3) | _BV(MUX2) | _BV(MUX1);
      #endif  
    
      delay(2); // Wait for Vref to settle
      ADCSRA |= _BV(ADSC); // Start conversion
      while (bit_is_set(ADCSRA,ADSC)); // measuring
    
      uint8_t low  = ADCL; // must read ADCL first - it then locks ADCH  
      uint8_t high = ADCH; // unlocks both
    
      long result = (high<<8) | low;
    
      result = 1125300L / result; // Calculate Vcc (in mV); 1125300 = 1.1*1023*1000
      //result *= 1.0637;
      return result; // Vcc in millivolts
    }
    
    #include <stdarg.h>
    void p(const __FlashStringHelper *fmt, ... ){
      char buf[128]; // resulting string limited to 128 chars
      va_list args;
      va_start (args, fmt);
    #ifdef __AVR__
      vsnprintf_P(buf, sizeof(buf), (const char *)fmt, args); // progmem for AVR
    #else
      vsnprintf(buf, sizeof(buf), (const char *)fmt, args); // for the rest of the world
    #endif
      va_end(args);
      Serial.print(buf);
    }
    
    void mysleep(int SLEEP_TIME)
    {
        if(isTransportOK()){
          Serial << "| wait ";
          wait(25);
          Serial << "| zZz > ";
    
          sleep(SLEEP_TIME);
          Serial << "| < zZz " << endl;
        } 
        else {
          wait(1000);
        }
    }
    

  • Mod

    @cimba007 wow, you did some serious research there! (I see you make good use of the arduino plot function)
    I'll certainly come back to your research once I start with this sensor (so much to choose from...)
    Any ideas about current consumption? Is this a viable alternative to battery powered pir sensors?



  • @Yveaux From my oppinion the radar modules are not suited for battery usage. Their drain something like 3-5mA and are not easy to put to sleep. Remember the warm-up period of the BISS. It seems to be like 10-15seconds.

    The plots are from another sketch, not the one I posted but using them is pretty straight forward.

    In my sketch have a look at these parts:

      Serial << "| mw_min: ";
      int minimum = mw_s.minimum();
      p(F("%4d"),minimum);
      Serial << " ";
    

    To use the arduino plotting all you ahve to do is send a string like this:

    0,10,534,123 .. whatever .. beware that no other serial output should happen if you want to use the arduino build-in plotting. Using the streaming library ( http://arduiniana.org/libraries/streaming/ ) it all boils down to a single line:

    Serial << mw_s.minimum() << "," << mw_s.maximum() << "," << mw_s.pop_stdev() << endl;
    

    In addition to the power consumption my approach requires sampling the analog input for a whole second .. or the more the better.

    This might be improved if you can prevent the FC1816 from retriggering itself. I had some serious problems as during the "inhibitor" period the analogOutput from the 2nd amplification stage was quite high often instantly retrigger the biss-output after the inhibition period ended.

    One solution might be this:

    Try this if you want to look down this approch:

    • Power the FC1816 VCC and UDP through an RC-Section (100Ohm Resistor and after that (on the side of the FC1816) an capacitory ~100-220µF)
    • Replace amplification resistor from 105 to eg. 154 (lowering the amplification)

    To find the best value I used an variable resistor parallel to the 105-Ohms SMD-Resistor

    But .. don't forget the benefits of *he microwave sensor. You can mount it straight to a door and it would detect persons in front of the door without them noticing. For this reason I try to build an "Alarm-node" that can be hidden inside the house. Later I might improve the FC1816 with some aluminium foil for shielding as suggested earlier.

    I would suggest using an PIR if you need a battery powered node. Have a look at ( http://kavacky.lv/bypassing-sen-08630-pir-motion-sensors-voltage-regulator-to-work-with-3-3-v ). Some PIRs have a Regulator which might not be suited if you are running on battery using 3,3Volt.


  • Mod

    @cimba007 I know, I also used serial plotting for some projects. Very handy, very unstable (at that time). Probably improved since then, as I haven't used it recently.



  • All things from my previous post regarding the wiring are still needed:

    Here is a stripped down example on how to use the FC1816 Microwave Sensor. You need the following library:

    https://github.com/RobTillaart/Arduino/tree/master/libraries/Statistic

    #include "Statistic.h"
    
    #define MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN A1
    
    void setup()
    {
      
      Serial.begin(57600);
      Serial.print("begin");
      
      // Microwave
      pinMode(5,OUTPUT);        // VCC BISS0001
      digitalWrite(5,HIGH);
      
      pinMode(6,OUTPUT);        // Enabled
      digitalWrite(6,LOW);      // DISABLE PLEASE!
      
      pinMode(7,OUTPUT);        // GND
      digitalWrite(7,LOW);
    
      pinMode(A1,INPUT);        // PIR 2nd amplification stage
    
      pinMode(A0,OUTPUT);       // UPD microwave generator
      digitalWrite(A0,HIGH);
    
    }
    
    void loop()      
    {     
      // Report Microwave
      static Statistic mw_s;
      static uint16_t stdev_sum = 0;
      //mw_s.clear();
    
      //digitalWrite(8,HIGH);
      //delay(100);
      analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
      uint16_t reading;
      for(int i = 0; i < 200; i++)
      {
        reading = analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
        mw_s.add(reading);
        //Serial.println(reading);
        //Serial.flush();
        //delay(50);
        //LowPower.powerDown(SLEEP_60MS, ADC_ON, BOD_OFF);  
        //delay(1);
      }
      Serial.print(mw_s.minimum());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.average());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.maximum());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.pop_stdev()); Serial.print(",");
      stdev_sum += mw_s.pop_stdev();
      Serial.print(stdev_sum); //Serial.print(",");
      Serial.println();
      stdev_sum *= 0.9;
      mw_s.clear();
    }
    

    I just had the idea to sum up the std-dev and decrease it by 10% every round. Thus the code is less prone to peaks.

    0_1471429474464_upload-9c26c9f3-6ccd-4aaf-9bcc-797ad4c03be4

    stdev_sum is the lower dark blue line which can now be much easier compared to a threshold.

    Some measurement with my µCurrent-Gold:

    Unmodified code as above, power LED removed from ProMini @ 8Mhz internal osci with LDO desoldered
    4,8mA

    I tried to put the FC1816 into sleep by disable the power to the Microwave generator but this doesn't work.
    I modified the fuses for 8Mhz with 0ms wakeup delay for stabelizing the oscillator. No risk no phun 😉

    The most practical solution I got to replace a PIR (still nothing as close as a PIR ;-ö)

    1530µA

    with this code:

    Note that the radar generator just can't be disable as it needs 10-15seconds to stabelize after power up

    #include <LowPower.h>
    
    #include "Statistic.h"
    
    #define MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN A1
    
    void setup()
    {
      
      Serial.begin(57600);
      Serial.print("begin");
      
      // Microwave
      pinMode(5,OUTPUT);        // VCC BISS0001
      digitalWrite(5,HIGH);
      
      pinMode(6,OUTPUT);        // Enabled
      digitalWrite(6,LOW);      // DISABLE PLEASE!
      
      pinMode(7,OUTPUT);        // GND
      digitalWrite(7,LOW);
    
      pinMode(A1,INPUT);        // PIR 2nd amplification stage
    
      pinMode(A0,OUTPUT);       // UPD microwave generator
      digitalWrite(A0,HIGH);
    
    }
    
    void loop()      
    {     
      // Report Microwave
      static Statistic mw_s;
      static uint16_t stdev_sum = 0;
      //mw_s.clear();
    
      
      //delay(100);
      analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
      uint16_t reading;
      for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
      {
        LowPower.powerDown(SLEEP_15Ms, ADC_ON, BOD_OFF);  
        reading = analogRead(MICRO_SENSOR_ANALOG_PIN);
        mw_s.add(reading);
        //Serial.println(reading);
        //Serial.flush();
        //delay(50);
        LowPower.powerDown(SLEEP_15Ms, ADC_ON, BOD_OFF);  
        //delay(1);
      }
      Serial.print(mw_s.minimum());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.average());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.maximum());   Serial.print(",");
      Serial.print(mw_s.pop_stdev()); Serial.print(",");
      stdev_sum += mw_s.pop_stdev();
      Serial.print(stdev_sum); //Serial.print(",");
      Serial.println();
      Serial.flush();
      stdev_sum *= 0.9;
      mw_s.clear();
      
    }
    

  • Mod

    @cimba007 Thanks for the update 👍 Very interesting numbers!
    The 'sleep' current of 1.5mA rules out the microwave module as battery powered PIR replacement for me...
    As a mains powered sensor they're still very interesting, though!



  • After a few more days of testing I noticed these ugly "PEAKS" from my FC1816 readings. I added lots of capacitors and RC and LC sections but still .. nasty little peaks (left side in the beginning)

    0_1471879150498_upload-a9d03c1d-941a-4179-9306-7fb6eb708a7b

    In my previous post replace this line:

    stdev_sum += mw_s.pop_stdev();
    

    with this:

      // Ignore the first 3 peaks within short succession
      // Real movement should mean there are more peaks/activity over a long time
      static uint8_t peakcount = 0;
      if(mw_s.pop_stdev() > 30 && peakcount < 3)
      {
        peakcount++;
      }
      else
      {
        stdev_sum += mw_s.pop_stdev();
        stdev_sum *= 0.92; //
        if (stdev_sum >= 7)
          stdev_sum -= 7; // Default background noise
        if (stdev_sum > 512)
          stdev_sum = 512;    
    
        if(peakcount > 0)
          peakcount--;
      }
    

    With this code the first 3 peaks are essentially removed .. if there is really some movement it should last for a few seconds and would still be detected.

    I have invested like 10-20hours into testing and debugging the FC1816 and I can say .. this thing is .. peculiar ..

    I hate it cause of the spikes, the amplification which has to be manually altered with a pot .. but at the same time I love it ..

    I can detect my foot beckoning 2-3meters apart in my bed 😄

    An example of the code snipped in action:

    0_1471879619120_upload-a3996be3-43b2-417d-ab69-e2545d288fd3

    Here you can see the big spikes in the beginning completely ignored (1)

    0_1471879713596_upload-3031e15c-37cb-4799-8b4a-ea6c3193f6bf


  • Mod

    @cimba007 awesome to read about all the research and debugging you did on this topic!
    Did you consider pouring the code into a library, so it can be reused and updated easily?



  • Currently I don't plan to make a library .. a library implies that the sensor is very easy to use .. plug in + import library.

    The FC1816 is not such a sensor.

    • Needs Voltage-Supply filter (RC Section)
    • Need separate cable to grab the signal at the 2nd amplification stage
    • Need potentiometer to lower the amplification
    • Is very prone to random noise (in fact even entering RF24 or ATMEGA328 low power mode might increase noise floor a lot)

    Using a "simple to use" library and not getting the expected result of an "easy"-sensor would be very disappointing. For now I would say this is an advanced sensor with some pitfalls.

    I update this thread with my findings to hopefully make everybodys life a bit easyer if you want to tinker with the FC1816 although you now know it is a little beast 😉

    If you need any help just ask here and I will support you the best I can.


  • Mod

    Are there any new updates on these sensors? I noticed there are some "new" one that have 2 potentiometers like the standard PIR sensors.


  • Mod

    It's a review of some radar sensors if anyone is interested.

    #135 Radar Sensors / Switches: Comparison and Tests – 16:11
    — Andreas Spiess



  • @gohan Can you help how to bypass this sensor without changing of sensor ....


  • Mod

    I did not get what you meant



  • Does anyone have a complete MySensors sketch for these that they would be willing to share?

    I tried to create a wildlife sensor with it a while ago.. but the signal seemed to always be high.


  • Mod

    It depends a lot on the sensor type so minor changes need to be made on sketch to make it handle the inverse logic.





  • @alowhum
    Now I remembered that I once shot a video about this sensor. In the description below the video there are links to sketches that work with such sensors. But for this video I did not do subtitles in English, in sketches comments also seem to be in Russian. But I think it won't be a problem.

    Микроволновый датчик движения XYC-WB-DC часть №2 | Програмная задержка отключения – 11:36
    — SMART BOX

    Микроволновый датчик движения XYC-WB-DC часть №1 | Microwave motion sensor XYC-WB-DC part No. 1 – 07:16
    — SMART BOX


 

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