Using a sensor to sense the presence of copper wire.


  • Mod

    I am assuming that having a "close" and an "open" button is not an option, right?



  • The button you see mounted in the pic, is a momentary (normally closed) switch.

    If I can find a sensor to work properly, this will be used to open the spring loaded cylinder manually by the operator "after" the signal is sent to close the cylinder.

    If the sensor automation does not work out (to close the cylinder), the button will be to manually open the cylinder that will "always" be in the closed position. Push the button, cylinder opens, wire inserted, release button, cylinder returns to it's normally closed position.



  • The plan was to have this contraption automated in the clamping motion. Simply insert wire, sensor sends signal, closes the cylinder to clamp the wire in place.

    But if this is too difficult, I'll resort to Plan-B, which is having the cylinder always pressurized in the "clamp" position or "closed" position. Push the momentary, to open the cylinder, insert the wire, release the button, cylinder returns to closed / clamp position.

    The photo is only a test piece for experimentation. The REAL unit will be enclosed with a row of many cylinders / contacts / etc., with the ability to hold many different wires at once, all independent from one another.


  • Mod

    Given the variety of the wires diameters, I think the 1 or 2 buttons solution is the most reliable one. Just my 2 cents



  • @gohan said in Using a sensor to sense the presence of copper wire.:

    Given the variety of the wires diameters, I think the 1 or 2 buttons solution is the most reliable one. Just my 2 cents

    I agree.

    I can accomplish what I want with a single momentary. So, it's no big deal....just hoping to make it more automated.

    My original plan was to use a proximity switch. But I quickly learned the issues with consistently detecting copper.



  • @moparjay
    How about a pressure switch .
    I must be missing something here, what is the end point ?



  • How about a pressure switch .

    If you are referring to a pressure switch for the wire to apply the pressure, the wire will be as small as a human hair. Not capable of applying pressure.



  • @moparjay
    have you thought about using a jfet?

    see here for a google search




  • Mod

    It looks interesting, but I haven't seen if it may work with copper too



  • have you thought about using a jfet?

    Thanks for the info. But I'm fine with the simplicity of a momentary, if full-automation-clamping is too difficult...or expensive. LOL



  • @moparjay
    what about when sliding the wire into the top hole you give it a + charge and the base a - charge with a circuit that will do when the 2 touch.



  • what about when sliding the wire into the top hole you give it a + charge and the base a - charge with a circuit that will do when the 2 touch.

    If the range of wire size was tighter, this would probably work well. But with the wide range of sizes, trying to make contact with the smallest sizes would be a real pain.



  • @moparjay
    how about an "S" shape input tube any size would have to touch the tube on the inside the "S" shape tube can be any size you like.



    1. Optical detection: a light source on one side of the hole and a phototransistor on the other, read as analog values since the small wires won't completely cover the light source

    2. Inductive sensor, a coil around the hole, and some form of detecting the change of inductance, start by making a small coil and test with a LCR meter

    3. Capacitive sensor, open air dielectric, plates across the hole, the wire and operator (even holding the insulated wire) will change the capacitor response a lot, test with some capacitive/touch sensing circuitry.



  • Thanks to all that have given input. I'm going to give in and simply use the momentary to open the cylinder (normally closed). It's just too easy. And going automated is not worth the added expense, as this single cylinder prototype will be duplicated to almost (100) cylinders....each completely independent from one another. Thank you!!!


Log in to reply
 

319
Online

7.3k
Users

8.1k
Topics

87.5k
Posts

Looks like your connection to MySensors Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.